THIS DAY IN ROCK

October 23rd: Bob Dylan, Led Zeppelin, Nirvana, Def Leppard and more ...


On This Day in Rock

1963: The Beatles completed the final session for their second album 'With the Beatles' recording 'I Wanna Be Your Man.' The group then drove to London airport for a flight to Stockholm, Sweden to start their first foreign tour. The Fab four were met at Stockholm airport by hundreds of girl fans that had taken the day of school.

1963: Bob Dylan recorded 'The Times They Are A-Changin' at Columbia Recording Studios in New York City.

1966: The Jimi Hendrix Experience recorded their first single 'Hey Joe', at De Lane Lea studios in London.

1976: The Jam played an afternoon show in Soho Market, London, England and in the evening, The Clash appeared at The ICA in London.

1976: Led Zeppelin made their US television debut on Don Kirshner's Rock Concert, they performed ‘Black Dog’ and ‘Dazed And Confused’.

1980: Mark David Chapman quit his security job and signed out for the last time. Instead of the usual "Chappy" he wrote "John Lennon". Chapman would murder Lennon on December 8th of this year outside his New York City home.

1989: Nirvana played their first ever European show when the appeared at Newcastle's Riverside Club in North East England. It was the first night of a 36 date European tour for the group who were sharing the bill with Tad.

1993: Meat Loaf had his first UK No.1 with 'I'd Do Anything For Love' (But I Won't Do That'). It stayed at No.1 for seven weeks. A No.1 in twenty-eight countries and gave Meat Loaf his first US No.1 hit.

1995: Def Leppard gave themselves a place in the Guinness book Of World Records, by playing three gigs in three continents in 24 hours. Tangier, London and Vancouver.

2002: A federal judge in St. Louis dismissed a lawsuit against Chuck Berry by Johnnie Johnson, a piano player and former collaborator who wanted royalties for more than 30 songs written between 1955 and 1966. The songs in question included ‘No Particular Place To Go’, ‘Roll Over Beethoven’, and ‘Sweet Little Sixteen’. Johnson's lawsuit argued that he and Berry were co-writers on many of the songs, but because Berry copyrighted them in his name alone, Johnson got none of the royalties. The judge ruled that too many years had passed to bring about a royalties suit.


 «  Return to previous page
 »  Send to a friend