THIS DAY IN ROCK

April 19th: Jimi Hendrix, Smile, Bruce Springsteen, Brian Johnson and more ...


On This Day in Rock

1965: The Beatles single 'Ticket to Ride' was released on Capitol records in the US. The single's label stated that the song was from the upcoming movie "Eight Arms to Hold You" (the original name for the movie "Help!").

1967: Jimi Hendrix, The Walker Brothers, Engelbert Humperdink and Cat Stevens, played two shows at The Odeon, Birmingham, England.

1968: John Lennon, George Harrison and their wives left the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi's ashram in Rishikesh, India two weeks before their study was complete. Ringo and Paul had already left.

1969: Smile, later to be known as Queen, appeared at the Revolution Club in London, England.

1974: Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band appeared at the State Theatre in New Brunswick, New Jersey. The gig was unadvertised by its promoter, who gambled that word-of-mouth would be enough to fill the 550-seat venue, only 250 people attended. Tickets cost $4.50 and $5.50 in advance.

1975: During a 29 date North American tour, Pink Floyd appeared at the Tucson Community Center Arena, Tuscon, Arizona.

1980: 32 year old English singer with Geordie Brian Johnson joined Australian group AC/DC, replacing Bon Scott who died after a drinking binge.

1980: R.E.M. played their first gig as R.E.M. at the 11:11 Koffee Club, Athens, Georgia to 150 people. The show ended at 2am when police closed it down due to the venue being unlicensed.

2000: Phil Collins won £250,000 in a high court case over royalties with two former members of his band. The judge ruled that they had been overpaid in error but because the two musicians had no other income they would not have to pay it back.

2006: BBC TV in the UK aired The McCartneys v The Fur Trade a program following the couple's anti-fur trade protests.

2010: A week after Catholic Church officials published an article in the Vatican's L'Osservatore Romano newspaper that said they forgive John Lennon's remarks about The Beatles being "bigger than Jesus", Ringo Starr rejected their forgiveness. The newspaper's editors had written, "The Beatles said they were bigger than Jesus and put out mysterious messages, that were possibly even Satanic... (but) what would Pop music be like without the Beatles?" Ringo was unimpressed and replied "Didn't the Vatican say we were Satanic or possibly Satanic? And they've still forgiven us? I think the Vatican, they've got more to talk about than the Beatles."


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